Brad Day

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Brad Day

Brad Day is a professor in the Michigan State University Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences. Over the past 11 years, his laboratory has made pioneering and sustained contributions in the area of plant-pathogen interactions; specifically, in the area of cell biology. In total, his group has made foundational discoveries defining the function of the actin cytoskeleton in the Arabidopsis-Pseudomonas syringae interaction, a model for the study of bacterial pathogenesis and disease susceptibility in plants. He has a broad background in plant and microbial biology, studying the fundamental mechanisms of how plants and microbes interact, using, and developing, a variety of in vivo techniques. Day's overall research goal is to make fundamental discoveries in host-pathogen interactions, and to address key gaps in our understanding of how plants defend against pathogens. A full description of his research interests can be found at www.msudaylab.org.

During his time at MSU, he has mentored more than 30 postdocs, graduate students, and visiting scientists, many of which have found permanent positions in universities and industries in the U.S. and abroad. To support his research, Day has enjoyed continuous funding from the NSF since 2007, as well as served as co-PI and PI USDA and industry/commodity funding. As a result, he is keenly aware of the importance of research dissemination, as well as the significance of time-management and delivery of information through publication. His experiences and collegial interactions with faculty at MSU have also led him to broaden his research interests to look beyond the system, and to focus on the mechanism. To this end, he continually integrates and develops new approaches to address the questions that his lab group pursues.